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Help is on the way!

It’s time we help Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) missionaries more than ever before!

As you know, the postal service is delivering mail slower than anyone can remember due to deficits and layoffs, and SBC missionaries are bearing the brunt of the delays.

In the 1980s when I began working at the Baptist General Convention of Oklahoma (BGCO), mail would arrive from anywhere in Oklahoma at a maximum delivery time of two days. Most mail arrived in just one day. This is not possible anymore!

I estimate that SBC missionaries are receiving funding from the SBC Executive Committee at least seven days late due to the postal service (after churches send to the BGCO and we send to the SBC). On top of receiving their funding late, there is less funding due to the slower oil and natural gas economy. So, what can we do to “speed things up”?

Thanks for asking! The answer is Online Church Remittance Giving. Yes, we are in the 21st Century technologically, and the BGCO has arrived!

In fact, the process was launched in January and is approaching the 50 percentile with churches using this new format. Any church that has access to a computer and the Internet can now send its offerings for Cooperative Program, Edna McMillan State Missions Offering, Disaster Relief, Lottie Moon, Annie Armstrong, etc., via the BGCO website.

It’s so simple! To enroll, simply go to www.bgco.org and select the “Give” button and then select Cooperative Program Remittance. If you would like more information you may call the BGCO Income Clerk at 405/942-3000, ext. 4537.

No monies are transmitted online as the process is accomplished using an ACH Debit between banks. No fees will be charged to your church. No paper check, form or envelope will be used, plus you will save time. Best of all, missionaries will receive their support faster than ever before!

Thank you for giving online to support our missionaries!

Kerry Russell

Author: Kerry Russell

BGCO Finance Team Leader, CFO

View more articles by Kerry Russell.

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