Navigation Menu

BLOG: Reminiscent Rose Petal Jelly

Flowers are a special gift that God has given us. In Luke 12:27 we read, “ Consider the lilies, how they grow: they neither toil nor spin; but I tell you, not even Solomon in all his glory clothed himself like one of these.”

The beauty of flowers bring a garden to life and offer color, fragrance and taste that is unmatched. However, in the world of edible gardening, they are often disregarded because many people just don’t think about eating their flowers. Not all flowers are edible, and others are just too pretty to put a fork in.

The rose is the king of all flowers. Its elegant blooms are eagerly awaited in the spring, and if you planted a variety that puts on a second round of blooms in the fall, it’s a real garden perk.

Over the years, I have experimented with different recipes that feature their delicate beauty and lovely taste. They are high in Vitamin C, and we enjoy them in our herbal teas and salads, but nothing can compare with delicious rose petal jelly.

Both of my grandmas and my parents enjoyed food preservation and taught me how to make delicious jams and jellies by using fruit that was abundant in Oklahoma. Many times, it was free to anyone who was willing to just go do the picking. We would spend hours gathering sandplums or wild blackberries and bring them home to make our treasures.

Over the years, I asked several of my relatives and friends if they had ever eaten rose petal jelly, but none of them had. It was then that I decided to develop my own rose petal jelly recipe and utilize the beautiful flowers that were growing in my yard.

This jelly is unique, easy to make and beautiful in its little jar—oh, and did I say it tastes amazing!  My mans-man of a husband says that it’s his favorite!  Who would’ve thought?

To make this jelly, you will need 2 cups of fresh rose petals. You know, the ones that remind you of your grandma’s yard. Harvest several of your very fragrant (free from all chemicals) roses and hand-pluck the petals. Use only good quality petals that are free from blemishes.

Once the petals are removed, discard the stems and place the petals in a strainer. Gently wash the petals under cool, running water.

Place the petals in a large pan and cover with 4 1/2 cups of warm water.  Place the pan over a Medium High heat burner.

Bring the petals and the water to a boil and then turn off the burner.  Cover the pan with a lid and allow to sit for 15 minutes.

Remove the lid.  Use a strainer to remove one half (1/2) of the limp rose petals and discard them.  Leave the other half (1/2) in the pan with the water.

Stir one (1.75 oz.) box of 100 percent Natural Sure Jell Premium Fruit Pectin into the rose petal and hot water mixture and bring it to a boil that cannot be stirred down over a Medium High heat burner.  Boil for one (1) minute.

After the one (1) minute, quickly stir in five (5) cups of white sugar that has been pre-measured. Once again, bring the mixture to a rolling boil that cannot be stirred down over a Medium High heat burner and boil for 1 ½ minutes.

Remove the pan from the burner.

Pour the jelly into 12 (8 oz.) jelly jars that have been sterilized and are hot.  Make sure after pouring, that each jar rim is clean and free of any sticky substance that that would keep it from sealing properly.  Seal the jars with hot lids and rings and place in a water bath canner. Bring the water to a full, rolling boil and set your timer for 15 minutes.

After 15 minutes, remove the jars from the canner and allow to sit on the cabinet, undisturbed, until completely cool.  You should hear each lid “pop” indicating that the jar is properly sealed. That little “pop” is true music to the ears of any canner!

Thank you, Father, for giving us these garden lovelies. May we enjoy them and offer praise to Your name.

Lori Coats

Author: Lori Coats

Lori Coats is a Master Gardener, herbalist and mentor to young women, teaching them to love God and their families through gardening, food preservation and cooking. She’s spent more than 20 years working in Agritourism, horticulture, specialty crops and public gardens and owns My Raggedy Herbs, a teaching garden in Oklahoma.

View more articles by Lori Coats.

Share This Post On
Like so many other organizations around the state and country, Oklahoma Baptists are closely monitoring news and information about the spread of COVID-19 (Coronavirus).Learn More Here.
+